Impact

Washington is one of the least affordable states for child care. And, in King County, the cost of full-time infant care in a center is about $1,500 a month. For low-income parents, this expense is just too great. Dreams of a higher education and a brighter financial future diminish greatly when the reality of child care costs hit home.

Seattle Milk Fund empowers parents toward higher education opportunities by funding child care grants and providing family support. Seattle Milk Fund’s goal is for parents to realize their higher education potential, which can create a brighter and more stable financial future for their families.

The Seattle Milk Fund provides child care and family support funding to low-income families while one or both of the parents attend school full-time. Our grants benefit the whole family. While the parents work towards their educational goals and financial independence, the children are provided with a valuable learning opportunity in a quality, licensed childcare facility or preschool.

Download Seattle Milk Fund’s Report Card from 2014-2015.

Our Grants Make a Difference

Our families are one or two parent households whose income falls within 250% of the federal poverty guideline. Each grantee receives:

  • Childcare grant(s) of up to $2,000 per quarter/ 0-2 yrs; up to $1,500 per quarter/ 3-5 yrs; and up to $1,00 per quarter/ 6-12 yrs.
  • A family support grant of $450 each quarter;
  • Holiday support; and
  • Encouragement from a Seattle Milk Fund Family Support Advocate.

Our Success Rate

95% of our grantees successfully complete each academic quarter, while averaging a 3.5 quarterly GPA.

Recent Seattle Milk Fund graduates include dental hygienists, medical assistants, teachers, nurses, accountants, software engineers, social workers, and midwives. Many of our students report that they are the first person in their family ever to have graduated from college or technical school.

“Without the help from Seattle Milk Fund I would not be able to be in school right now. Without the child care assistance, we could not afford for me to not be working. I’m graduating in about four months, and I have a job lined up already. I’ll be making considerably more money than I was making before school. I’ll be working as a software developer. I’ve gone from a field that was struggling to one that is highly in demand. It’s definitely changing the direction for our family.”
John, a Seattle Milk Fund Grantee

Statistics

146 million Americans are low income or poor.

Children are less likely to be poor when their parent has some college education.

The income status of children under the age of 18, by parental education is as follows:


Resources

National Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies. (2011). 2011 Child Care in the State of Washington. Retrieved from http://www.naccrra.org/randd/data/docs/WA.pdf.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2017018125_lowincome15.html.

National Data Source:  U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey (2010), Annual Social and Economic Supplement (March), Official Poverty Tables.      

State Data Source:  American Community Survey (2009).

Or check out www.childtrendsdatabank.org for more information.